BPO, CallCenter, Contact Centre, Customer service, Outsourcing, theOutsourcing-guide

Creating an Amazing Mobile Experience

The evolution of smarter smartphones and greater access to data sources offers innovative organisations the opportunity to create amazing mobile experiences for their customers. 2015 is the year of mobility where organisations are starting to invest heavily in mobile and responsive websites as well as mobile applications. They are throwing money at the technology, but does that mean they are creating amazing experiences for their customers?

The 2015 State of Marketing Report from Salesforce, based on a survey of 5000 marketers globally including Australia, discovered that two-thirds of respondents have integrated mobile into their marketing strategy. That’s up from 48 percent in 2014 and 65 per cent plan to spend more on mobile push notifications.

Just having mobility as part of your marketing and customer service strategy is not enough. You need to get into the minds and shoes of your customers to understand their mindset and the sort of mobile experiences they are looking for from your brand.

Understanding the role of mobility in the customer journey and mindset

Mobile customers have less time than other customers. They may be walking down the street, on the bus on their way to work, shopping or waiting in a queue, or travelling on holidays. They are more demanding than normal online customers at a desktop. They have less time and are restricted by screen size and the lack of a keyboard or mouse.

When building your mobility channel and platforms there should be two things that you are aiming to achieve[i]:

  1. Allowing customers to find what they want and complete a transactions in the easiest, fastest and most convenient way possible
  2. Provide an experience compelling enough that they’ll come back again and again.

So rather than thinking of what marketing messages you can push out to them. Think of how you can improve the experience of dealing with your brand. How can you simplify the experience? How can you add value? Or even how can you make it more entertaining and fun?

Don’t try everything at once

Don’t fall into the trap of doing what everyone else (ie your competitors) are doing. And try to avoid making major investments that require significant resources and long implementation time frames. As Chris Luxford, Senior Partner from Experience Innovators, advises, “Instead of a few big and long investments that are predominantly still focused on “better service at a lower cost”. Innovate via a customer outcome mindset and lots and lots of smaller frequent changes across the entire customer lifecycle”.

This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t have a long term strategy and plan. It’s the very opposite in fact. It’s about achieving short term goals and gains as part of realising your long term vision to engage your customers with amazing experiences.

[i] http://www.oracle.com/us/products/applications/tips-engaging-mobile-experience-1505010.pdf.

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, CallCenter, Human resources

Take Me To Your Leader!

“Take me to your leader” is a science fiction cartoon catch phase, said by an extra-terrestrial alien who has just landed on earth in a flying saucer to the first human it happens to meet. It suggests that every organisation has to have someone in charge.

Leadership has been described as “a process of social influence in which a person can enlist the aid and support of others in the accomplishment of a common task”  (Chemers M. (1997)

Many organisations struggle with leadership development at all levels. Recently, Deloitte unveiled its Global Human Capital Trends 2015 report, highlighting leadership as a top ten concern for most companies. The success of any outsourcing relationship is dependent on the quality of leadership from both the vendor as well as the client. Unfortunately, too many organisations adopt a one-size fits all approach to leadership development.

What is leadership?

Leadership is the art of getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it. – Dwight D. Eisenhower

Leaders help themselves and others to do the right things. They set direction, build an inspiring vision, and create something new. Leadership is about mapping out where you need to go to “win” as a team or an organization; and it is dynamic, exciting, and inspiring.

Yet, while leaders set the direction, they must also use management skills to guide their people to the right destination, in a smooth and efficient way.

Anyone in any position of authority likes to think they are a good leader. We can all think of examples of good and bad leaders, no matter what the incumbents thought themselves. Each executive, manager, team leader, and supervisor in your organisation most probably has his or her own definition of what leadership is.

Everybody has his or her own ideas about what it takes to be a good leader. For some it’s about having a strong vision and the capability to share it and have others support it[i]. For others it’s about empowering people to achieve their best. While some view leadership as the ability to encourage others to be leaders.

Leadership is all these things.

Fundamentally leaders are people who know how to achieve goals and obtain the necessary support from others to make things happen. Good leaders are necessary for organisations to grow and succeed. Good leaders are inclusive and bring people along with them.

Companies and BPO providers invest small fortunes in leadership development programs. Around $US 170 billion is spent globally on corporate training each year with 35% of this being spent on leadership development[ii].

Why many leadership programs fail

Many leadership programs assume that one size fits all and that the same group of skills or style of leadership is appropriate regardless of strategy, commercial situation and organisational culture[iii]. A BPO service provider may need to develop different styles of leaders depending on the contracts and nature of the clients they need to work with. It may need different leadership styles depending on the industries they target and general economic conditions.

Is the organisation in a fast growing and dynamic space requiring leaders brimming with ideas and technical know-how, who are prepared to take risks. Or is the organisation facing sluggish market demand and needs people who can control costs and streamline processes.

A good starting point for developing leadership within your organisation may be to come up with your own definition or range of definitions for the term. Define what characteristics are necessary for someone to be a good leader in your environment and at what level within your organisation.

Characteristics may include things like honesty, active listening, the ability to delegate, confidence, good communication, be organised and so on. What characteristics you choose and the importance you give to each will depend on the culture and objectives of your organisation.

Are good leaders made or born?

There are various debates about whether leaders are born or made or some combination of both. One thing that is fairly certain is that a brilliant leader in one situation does not necessarily perform well in another[iv].

As an employer you must decide which characteristics or skills you can help people develop to become good leaders, specifically within your organisation and what characteristics do they need to bring with them when they are employed.

As the BPO industry continues to evolve, diversify and adapting to an ever-changing world and business environment, leadership is becoming increasingly complex and demanding. Meeting that gap is a significant challenge requiring more than a one-size fits all approach.

And lastly: “My Religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.”    The Dalai Lama

Kindness is a leadership characteristic that will deliver financial and humanitarian returns beyond imagination. It helps us create work environments that are based on trust and that allow people to express and experience meaning and purpose at work.

Kindness is the willingness to open one’s heart to another and to do so as instinct, not as calculation. Kindness is a show of respect for someone, whether you agree with his or her point of view or not. Kindness leads to listening, to curiosity and to the creation of environments at work, home and in the community, where there is an unspoken covenant of honour and of worthiness. It helps us internalize and cultivate an understanding that none of us can survive or achieve personal or organizational success alone.

Focus on happiness

What about your company makes you happy? What makes you unhappy? By asking two such simple questions, a manager can discover how best to motivate his employees, persuade his customers, and support its shareholders. According to the Dalai Lama, happiness is the highest universal form of motivation. A happy company is a successful company. You are more invested in success when you care about where it comes from.

[i] http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/3647-leadership-definition.html

[ii] http://www.forbes.com/sites/joshbersin/2014/02/04/the-recovery-arrives-corporate-training-spend-skyrockets/

[iii] http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/leading_in_the_21st_century/why_leadership-development_programs_fail

[iv] http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/leading_in_the_21st_century/why_leadership-development_programs_fail

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

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BPO, CallCenter, Contact Centre, News, Outsourcing

Is your Client Data at Risk?

By Mark Atterby

data-securityIn the wake of headline-making attacks and data breaches of Sony Pictures, JP Morgan, Snapchat and others, information security is becoming one of the highest priorities in BPO engagements. Organisations are sensitive about their data and want to know that it’s protected and being handled with care.

The costs to a client can be enormous both in reputation and direct financial impact. Just this month AT&T in North America was fined $25 million by the US Federal Communications Commission, for data security breaches at a call centre the company employed in Mexico to handle Spanish language services.

Employees working for the call centre stole private information belonging to thousands of US customers, including names, full and partial social security numbers, and account-related data. They sold this information to a 3rd party to unlock stolen mobile phones.

This is just one example. According to Gemalto’s Breach Level Index for 2014, 1,500 data breaches led to one billion data records compromised worldwide during 2014. These numbers represent a 49% increase in data breaches and a 78% increase in data records that were either stolen or lost compared to 2013.

It impacts the whole industry

Not only does a major security breach harm the client’s business – it strikes at the very heart of the industry as a whole. Security and how well a BPO provider can demonstrate their commitment to it is increasingly becoming a deal breaker.

Clients need to audit the security procedures of any prospective vendor. If the vendor will be handling information in regards to payments or credit cards then ensure their systems are PCI compliant.

One of the causes of data breaches is from internal employees or former possibly disgruntled employees. Centres with high turnover have a more significant challenge in maintaining control and security.

There are various measures contact centres are deploying to ensure BPO staff do not breach client’s confidentiality and mis-appropriately use their data. Some of these measures include[i]:

  • Creating a paperless environment, preventing employees from writing down and removing information by ensuring that all work processes are done on the computer, without having to record anything on forms or notes.
  • Prohibiting the use of mobile phones and cameras on the floor.
  • Prohibiting paper, pens and digital recording devices from being brought onto the floor.
  • Preventing internet access for employees on the floor.
  • Limiting functionality and access of personal computers or terminals used by call centre agents (for example, disabling USB ports). Companies may also use data loss prevention software to block attempts to download, copy, or transmit sensitive electronic data.

A provider that can’t keep its clients’ customers’ information secure is exposing their client to considerable risk. An organisation can outsource an activity but not its responsibility to the secure handling of private information.

[i] http://www.csoonline.com/article/2122795/physical-security/call-center-security–how-to-protect-employees-and-customers.html

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, Customer Servs, Technology

Has BPaaS Finally Come of Age?

By Martin Conboy 

Businessman accessing modern social networking interfaceEnterprises across the globe are realising the need to embrace cloud technology. Thus, business processes are also being moved to the cloud because of the inflexible service delivery models of traditional BPO, and the old technologies that limit the effectiveness of business process outcomes.

As companies shift to SaaS, on premises – desktop software deployment is declining rapidly, expected to drop from 34 percent to 17 percent by 2017, according to Gartner. However, because of security concerns, organisations are increasing the adoption of private cloud more than public cloud. Experienced BPO providers are navigating this new reality, looking for opportunities to offer organisations BPaaS (Business Process as a Service), RPA and secure private cloud infrastructure.

BPaaS is any type of horizontal or vertical business process that’s delivered based on the cloud services model. It is a sourcing model where buyers receive standardised business process services on a pay-as-you-go basis by accessing a shared set of resources (people, application, and infrastructure) from a single provider. For example, a company may have a complex process for recruitment automation that it would outsource.

BPaaS services allow you to experiment with new business process ideas because they’re not based on programming each individual business initiative. For example, a packaged BPaaS offering that handles business travel processing or order-to-cash processes may be available, as well as other services that will handle load processing or payroll services, and predesigned services useful for everything from processing claims to managing clinical data for drug trials.

Strong market growth predicted

MarketsandMarkets forecasts the global BPaaS Market and Cloud BPM will be worth $7.12 billion in 2018. The key forces driving this market forward are the development of automated and software driven outsourcing, growing need for cost effective business processes and the market trend of employing cloud computing technology.

The research highlights that the adoption of these solutions has been relatively slow due to the cautious approach of senior management and compliance concerns. However, these solutions are now experiencing continual growth with expanding penetration across all major verticals.

Why BPaaS?

BPO’s traditional value proposition was the ability to reduce costs at the operational level through labour arbitrage. Buyers are increasingly evaluating operational, business application and technology infrastructure costs in a more integrated approach.

The difference between traditional packaged applications and BPaaS is that BPaaS is designed to be service-oriented. So, BPaaS is likely to have well-defined interfaces. In addition, a BPaaS is a standardised service for use by many different organizations. Because these services are much more optimized to deliver a service consistently, they can leverage automation, standardisation, and repeatability in the way the services are used and delivered.

BPaaS is radically different to traditional outsourcing models. BPaaS aims to integrate the value extracted from traditional labour arbitrage with the Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) concept at the business application layer, and Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) construct at the technology infrastructure layer in an integrated manner.

The growing demand for automation and virtualisation of workplace[i] makes these solutions very desirable, particularly for organisations with a global footprint.

BPaaS offers organisations increased agility of their business processes while keeping costs down. It provides organisations with access to critical technology and the service resources required to implement, deploy, train, and manage the critical technology without the huge capital expenditure.

The following characteristics define BPaaS:

  • The BPaaS sits on top of the other three foundational cloud services: SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS.
  • A BPaaS service is configurable based on the process being designed.
  • A BPaaS service must have well-defined APIs so it can be easily connected to related services.
  • A BPaaS must be able to support multiple languages and multiple deployment environments because a business cannot predict how a business process will be leveraged in the future.

A BPaaS environment must be able to handle massive scaling. The service must be able to go from managing a few processes for a couple of customers to being able to support hundreds if not thousands of customers and processes. The service accomplishes that objective by optimizing the underlying cloud services to support this type of elasticity and scaling.

Who’s who in BPaaS

Here’s a list of companies in this field and the business processes they deliver:

  • eBay: Provides an electronic auction service
  • PayPalProvides an Internet payment capability as a service
  • SkypeOwned by Microsoft, Skype provides Voice over IP (VoIP) telephone calls as a service, most of which are free
  • GoogleProvides an Internet search capability as a service
  • This service is free when you have access to the Internet. Google also provides an Internet e-mail service, Gmail. Google has quite a few other services, including maps, news aggregation, Google Apps, and so on.
  • YouTubeProvides video self-publishing as a service and was acquired by Google
  • Yahoo!Like Google, Yahoo! provides an Internet search service and e-mail service
  • MailChimp and Constant ContactProvide services for sending out online newsletters and marketing campaigns
  • CraigslistOffers small ads as a service
  • WordPressHosts blogs as a service
  • LinkedInOffers business contacts and networking as a service

Facebook and TwitterProvide social networking services that have a huge reach across the globe

[i] http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/PressReleases/business-process-as-a-service-bpaas.asp.

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, CallCenter, Contact Centre, News, Offshoring, Outsourcing, theOutsourcing-guide

Are you talking to me?

Despite being the channel customers love to hate IVR (Interactive Voice Response) is still growing and is predicted to be worth $2.78 billion by 2017, according to a 2012 report from Global Industry Analysts (GIA)[i]. The growth is being driven by outbound IVR to deliver important notifications and proactive customer service functions.

IVR has had a mixed history, on one hand reducing call wait times and improving overall efficiencies and service levels, on the other, driving customers to switch to competitors.

We’re all familiar with the experience of having to navigate through a complex and confusing IVR menu to finally be put through to the wrong department or service or for the call to drop out. The experience leaves you frustrated. Badly designed IVR systems may have contributed to bad customer experiences more than any other channel.

Key areas in IVR development in recent years, that are altering the previous negative perceptions of this self-service technology, have been in Outbound IVR and Visual IVR.

Outbound IVR

Outbound IVR allows organisations to proactively and automatically engage customers through a variety of channels such as automated voice calls, SMS messages, email or social media posts with personalised communications. Providing immediate, faster and real-time information and services to customers Calls can range from personalised, event-triggered notifications and two-way interactions to broadcast messages to hundreds or even thousands of customers.

It can be used in a variety of situations including:

  • Sending emergency notifications,
  • Personalised offers and promotions
  • Travel-related notifications
  • Problem reporting
  • Change notifications (account status, billing, rates)
  • Shipping notifications

Visual IVR

Steve Morrell, founder and principal analyst of ContactBabel, an analyst firm for the contact centre industry, highlights how smartphones and tablets can give companies the option of offering visual representations of their IVR menus[ii]. This can enhance the customer experience as most people find it easier to read and select options in text and visual format than to listen to it being spoken.

Visual IVR presents customers with a menu driven interface to the IVR system which is available from a website or mobile app.  Visual IVR can be used to send video or push other content. This content can be educational or for marketing purposes or to assist the customer’s self-service requirement in some way.

Visual IVR allows companies to connect their traditional contact centre channels to new mobile platforms, enhancing their ability to serve customers. Visual IVR can be implemented with existing DMTF technology and IVR systems, requiring few modifications.

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, CallCenter, Contact Centre, Customer Servs, Human resources, News, theOutsourcing-guide

Let’s Work Together

By Martin Conboy

“Together we’ll stand
Divided we’ll fall
Come on now, people
Let’s get on the ball

And work together
Come on, come on
Let’s work together
Now, now people
Because together we will stand
Every boy, every girl and man

People, when things go wrong
As they sometimes will
And the road you travel
It stays all uphill “
Canned Heat

Canned Heat is an American blues band that formed in California in 1965.

Back then in the hippy era it was all about finding ways for people to collaborate with each other. It’s fundamental ethos — including harmony with nature, communal living, artistic experimentation particularly in music, spread around the world during the counter culture of the 1960s. A move away from the command and control environment of previous generations. The hippie movement has found historical precedents as far back as the Mazdakist movement in Persia that advocated communal living and the sharing of resources. In other words the movement grew because of a shared state of mind.

The world has moved on from those heady days however a lot of very valuable lessons were learnt. Fast forward to today and a key ingredient in building successful, innovative and strategic BPO relationships is collaboration. In other words, the ability for organisations to go beyond the typical vendor/client arrangement to work together for shared goals and objectives. If we want to change the status quo from the master/ slave relationships that largely exist in BPO relationships today we are going to need nothing short of a revolution in the way that we think and in the ways that BPO contracts are constructed.  Contracts cannot be so written that they give a disproportional level of power to one side or the other, as the dominant side may act arbitrarily in the absence of any constraints to the detriment of the other side.  We need to think of a contract more as a ‘living’ contract, in so much as it can be changed as required to make it work for all parties.

However for it to work it needs more structure that what was on offer during the hippy era. In part, this requires a governance model based on joint management structures and committees, but more importantly it requires the client and vendor to possess attitudes and behaviours that promote partnership and collaboration.

These days clients expect their provider to drive transformation and improve legacy processes, but, as Adam Cummins, Principal for Pace Harmon points out, letting go of old processes, approaches and perspectives and allowing the BPO provider to make changes to deliver improvements, efficiencies and savings can be a challenge[i].

The biggest challenge is that the client does not have the attitudes, behaviours or talent and skill sets necessary for collaboration. In all fairness these may also be lacking on the vendor side of things. Research[ii]from the London School of Economics and sponsored by Accenture, highlights that implementing joint operating, management, and executive committees, without having the right partnering attitudes and behaviours in place may inhibit rather than promote the success of a BPO relationship.

Governance structures are important, but the client must fully appreciate the provider as a strategic partner rather than as a vendor[iii]. A true partnership needs to display behaviours such as resolving conflicts fairly and protecting both parties’ commercial interests. Contract constructed around an adversarial approach usually only produce winners and losers, business environments change -likewise BPO relationships need the flexibility to meet shifting market demands and commercial realities. Thus contracts that allow for a team made up of executives from both sides to investigate the facts of a contract failure as opposed to an adversarial approach when one side wins may be worth considering.  After all a loser means that one side will have little or no interest in maintaining the contract.

Internal silos a barrier to collaboration

The inability for organisations to collaborate with a partner can stem from internal silos and reluctance to share information within the organisation. Client executives and leaders need to promote collaboration with their internal teams. Collaboration requires, first and foremost, a change in attitude and behaviour of people throughout the client organisation.

Client teams need to work with teams from the provider just as much as they need to work with other internal teams.

Trust and respect each other

Trust is the belief or confidence that one party has in the reliability, integrity and honesty of another party. It is the expectation that the faith one places in someone else will be honoured. The client and provider need to establish trust between their respective teams before they can effectively collaborate.

Teams that are suspicious or cynical of each other will not share information or collaborate effectively, and may even work to undermine each other.

Relationships develop and change over time. The ones that endure and stand the test of time are based on trust and  allow for a true collaborative approach rather than one that gets bogged down in the governance structures imposed by a contract.

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com


theOutsourcing-guide.com
 is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, CallCenter, Contact Centre, News, Offshoring, Outsourcing

The Balanced Shore approach

By Mark Atterby

Most leading BPO and outsourcing providers are offering clients flexible outsourcing location options. Datamark research highlights that these location options include at-home; on-site; off-site within the same city; off-site at a lower-cost-of-living city; nearshore; farshore; and blends of these arrangements [i].

It’s all about finding the right skills at the right price and how you manage and integrate them to deliver improved services based on economies of scope. Each scenario has its benefits and disadvantages. That’s why most providers, certainly the larger and more established providers try to use a blended approach.

Global Delivery Model – onshore, nearshore, farshore

A global delivery model allows a BPO provider to access the best talent at the best price in relation to the tasks and processes that need to be managed. The more complex activities that need greater involvement or collaboration with the client may need to be managed by operations situated locally to the client. Tasks that are fairly straight forward can be offshored or nearshored to a cheaper location.

Nearshore options, though not as cheap as an offshore location, may still be cheaper than local operations where strong cultural alignment is necessary. Travel to a nearshore or regional location may also be easier.

Peter Monk, Country Manager from Concentrix, believes that you need to have local operations if you want to be a provider who wants to deliver true innovation and collaboration. To build the teams that need to work together from the different organisations, they need to be in fairly close proximity to each other.

Homeshoring

The deployment of home based agents or homeshoring has become popular over the last decade. It often means reduced costs for the BPO provider as home based workers often provide their own telephone equipment and computer systems. The provider also saves on the associated costs of office space.

Using home based agents that are local to the client and its customer base can overcome the prejudice that is sometimes created from regional accents, mannerisms and rates of speech. Regional government departments and local government may tend to favour providers who employ people in their region.

Home shoring gives people with disabilities, who may not be able to travel to a workplace, the opportunity to work.   Research has highlighted that employees with disabilities often have a higher staff retention rate, which saves recruitment and training costs[ii].

By leveraging the right balance of locations, allows providers to build high quality, flexible and innovative solutions for their clients, yet keep costs down.

[i] https://www.datamark.net/blog/10-business-process-outsourcing-trends-2015

[ii] http://www.dwa.org.au/advantages.htm

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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