BPO, CallCenter, Contact Centre, Customer service, News, Outsourcing, theOutsourcing-guide

The multi-channel challenge

By Martin Conboy

The ability to offer customers the ability to communicate with a brand via a variety of channels has been the Holy Grail for the contact centre and BPO industries for quite some time. Now days customers are multi channel shoppers and business as a whole are struggling to meet the multi-channel expectations of their customers.

But how do you do this while maintaining consistency in the level and quality of service being provided. Adding new channels without a coherent and integrated channel strategy can lead to a chaotic and uncontrolled experience for customers. The exact opposite of what you want.

The goal of multi-channel customer service is to give customers a seamless experience irrespective of the channel they use to contact the organisation. Most companies recognise the importance of it, but acknowledge that they don’t have the systems or processes in place to do it effectively . Thus technology investment is critical to enabling exceptional customer experience. The ability to offer a multi channel experience is now a brand differentiator.

The challenge within

Most organisations cite internal structure as the main challenge. Silos within an enterprise means that the left hand doesn’t know what the right hand is doing. One may well find that serious departmental brick walls, or silos, exist in the organisation that can hinder its progress in terms of process effectiveness and efficiency – or worse, profitability.

The help desk handling support questions via live chat is not integrated with customer complaints or billing enquiry phone lines. Each departmental silo has its own view of the customer, that’s very different to how the rest of the organisation views them. Attitudes can differ significantly between different sets of departments and industries around a wide range of categories – including timeliness, information quality, trustworthiness, professionalism and impact of service.

As such the customer may feel they are dealing with a different organisation depending on the channel and the type of interaction they require. Adding another channel can more than likely fragment that view even further and frustrate the customer rather than improving their experience.

The complexity of trying to integrate these various channels is enormous, where organisations lose site of the forest because of all the trees. Just maybe it is better to have 2 or 3 channels that are highly effective than a dozen or so that aren’t working so well.

The data challenge

Customers themselves are fickle creatures. They don’t all want the same thing and what they want changes over time. Organisations have access to vast stores of customer data stored in transactional databases, surveys and feedback forms, on emails, social media platforms etc., that can be used to better understand customer behaviour and expectations. But unifying these data sources to provide actionable insight can be tantamount to searching for a needle in a haystack.

Continuous Partial Attention (CPA), is the process of paying simultaneous attention to a number of sources of incoming information, i.e. customer feedback, warehouse withdrawals, and website hits, but at a superficial level.

Linda Stone coined the term in 1998. Author, Steven Berlin Johnson, describes this as a kind of multitasking: “It usually involves skimming the surface of the incoming data; picking out the relevant details and moving on to the next stream. You’re paying attention, but only partially. CPA lets you cast a wider net but it also runs the risk of keeping you from really studying the fish”.

Operating under such a value network might lead a company to “listen too much” to its main customers. As a result, it will not recognise potentially disruptive innovations that serve only marginal customers. Secondly, large companies will not be interested in small markets; they hardly offer significant growth opportunities. Again this will lead companies to completely ignore the disruptive innovation or to wait until the market is “large enough to be attractive”. That is exactly when new entrants attack incumbent’s turf, and by that time it is usually too late.

Don’t try to be all things to all people all at once

Rome wasn’t built in a day, neither is multi-channel customer service. Take the time to evaluate the performance of each channel and how it can be improved and integrated with your other channels based on customer feedback and preferences.

Improve gradually over time rather than attempting too much all at once. Customers are more likely to be impressed by constant gradual improvement than a massive project to re-engineer everything, which might fall by the wayside for being too difficult.

https://econsultancy.com/reports/multichannel-customer-experience-report

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, Contact Centre, Customer service, Human resources

Managers must Manage their Bosses well

A key role of a managing director is managing his or her board. A well-managed board can be a great source of support, expertise and different perspective. A badly managed board can consume large amounts of management time, delay the making of strategic decisions and even lead to the removal of management altogether.

It is in the best interests of the whole leadership team to ensure that the board feels it is being heard, and that management is operating in a way compatible with the principles, intentions and strategic direction of the board. The relationship between a board and its leadership team is unique. When the board of company structure changes, so too should the approach the leadership team takes to its board management.

This is easier said than done. If a management team has invested heavily in devising its strategy, structuring the organisation and implementing new systems, it can get very attached to what it has created. Suppose the company is then merged or bought out, or the board changes for some other reason and the new board wants things done differently. How easy is it for the leadership team to back itself into a corner? Why change something that was working just for the sake of politics? Doesn’t it make more sense to invest time and energy in running the company than in answering a whole raft of questions from the board?

I remember working with two divisions of the same global company. The manager of one division thought the changed reporting requirements of head office were pointless and so ignored them (against, I might say, my advice). Not unexpectedly he was replaced. The head of the other division realised that unless he had the support of his leaders they would make his life and job untenable. He gave them what they wanted which allowed him the freedom to keep his independence.

Skills in upward management are essential for any leader. The job of a leader is to provide his or her superiors with information in the way they desire it so they can feel confident enough to grant a licence to operate. A licence to operate allows people to get on and do what they need to do to be successful.

By learning the political ropes and reporting in a way that builds trust, leaders create an environment in which their people can concentrate on the job at hand. This just doesn’t happen. The relationship between leaders up and down every organisation can be a winning tool for success or a constant block and annoyance. The difference is the willingness of each leader to manage his/her bosses’ need to know.

Margot is the creator of 12 Steps For Business; a strategic leadership and corporate transformation toolkit which enables leaders and organisations to envisage and achieve unprecedented levels of growth and success.

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, CallCenter, Contact Centre, Customer service, Outsourcing, theOutsourcing-guide

Creating an Amazing Mobile Experience

The evolution of smarter smartphones and greater access to data sources offers innovative organisations the opportunity to create amazing mobile experiences for their customers. 2015 is the year of mobility where organisations are starting to invest heavily in mobile and responsive websites as well as mobile applications. They are throwing money at the technology, but does that mean they are creating amazing experiences for their customers?

The 2015 State of Marketing Report from Salesforce, based on a survey of 5000 marketers globally including Australia, discovered that two-thirds of respondents have integrated mobile into their marketing strategy. That’s up from 48 percent in 2014 and 65 per cent plan to spend more on mobile push notifications.

Just having mobility as part of your marketing and customer service strategy is not enough. You need to get into the minds and shoes of your customers to understand their mindset and the sort of mobile experiences they are looking for from your brand.

Understanding the role of mobility in the customer journey and mindset

Mobile customers have less time than other customers. They may be walking down the street, on the bus on their way to work, shopping or waiting in a queue, or travelling on holidays. They are more demanding than normal online customers at a desktop. They have less time and are restricted by screen size and the lack of a keyboard or mouse.

When building your mobility channel and platforms there should be two things that you are aiming to achieve[i]:

  1. Allowing customers to find what they want and complete a transactions in the easiest, fastest and most convenient way possible
  2. Provide an experience compelling enough that they’ll come back again and again.

So rather than thinking of what marketing messages you can push out to them. Think of how you can improve the experience of dealing with your brand. How can you simplify the experience? How can you add value? Or even how can you make it more entertaining and fun?

Don’t try everything at once

Don’t fall into the trap of doing what everyone else (ie your competitors) are doing. And try to avoid making major investments that require significant resources and long implementation time frames. As Chris Luxford, Senior Partner from Experience Innovators, advises, “Instead of a few big and long investments that are predominantly still focused on “better service at a lower cost”. Innovate via a customer outcome mindset and lots and lots of smaller frequent changes across the entire customer lifecycle”.

This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t have a long term strategy and plan. It’s the very opposite in fact. It’s about achieving short term goals and gains as part of realising your long term vision to engage your customers with amazing experiences.

[i] http://www.oracle.com/us/products/applications/tips-engaging-mobile-experience-1505010.pdf.

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, Customer service, Human resources, Outsourcing

Learning how to tame your wicked problems

By Martin Conboy

Wicked problems are problems that cannot be solved. But they may be tamed. Obesity, climate change, the war on terror can be classified as wicked problems. To tame these problems the usual problem solving techniques based on rational linear analysis do not work. Customer service, particularly in the age of digital disruption, may be viewed as a wicked problem.

“It is hard to say what the problem is, to define it clearly or to tell where it stops and starts. There is no “right” way to view the problem, no definitive formulation. There are many stakeholders, all with their own frames, which they tend to see as exclusively correct. Ask what the problem is and you will get a different answer from each. Someone can always say that the problem is just a symptom of another problem and that someone will not be wrong. The problem is inter-connected to a lot of other problems; pulling them apart is almost impossible. In a word: it’s a mess.” – Jay Rosen of NYU

The term “wicked problem” was coined in 1973 by UC Berkeley scholars, Rittel and Webber. Essentially a wicked problem is difficult or impossible to solve because of incomplete, conflicting and changing requirements. C. West Churchman, systems scientist, describes wicked problems as “a class of social system problems, which are ill-formulated, where the information is confusing; where there are many clients and decision makers with conflicting values; and where the ramifications in the whole system are thoroughly confusing”.

The ongoing challenge of satisfying and exceeding customer expectations, which vary from customer to customer and are constantly changing, meets the criteria of a wicked problem. In this age of digital disruption, where social media and mobility are redefining the relationship between brands and consumers, organisations need to be more creative and innovative in their approach.

We are seeing a whole new suite of service offerings around the ‘customer experience’ and there are plenty of people claiming to have discovered the holy grail of what defines the customer experience. The challenge is that each and every customer is unique and we can no longer lump customers into the easy to manage, and understand segments of a few years ago.

Within an enterprise there are numerous stakeholders with different objectives, including employees, partners, management and shareholders. They each have different perspectives and aims, which may vary, dramatically from the goals of the company.

There’s the basic conflict of trying to deliver improved service, so as to improve loyalty, value and revenue from customer relationships, versus the costs associated with restructuring the business to offer better service. And the needs and requirements of customers, as individuals and as a group, can be largely hidden from managers and executives within an enterprise.

To solve their customer service issues, which also impact their sales and marketing objectives, organisations try to design and build systems and implement strategies. However, many traditional problem solving and project design approaches do not work. And despite their verbal commitment to innovation and improving the experiences of customers, many organisations remain fairly inert and their initiatives are simply tick-the-box exercises.

According to John Kolko, in his article Wicked Problems: Problems Worth Solving[i], most organisations are focused on one type of problem – differentiation. Innovation entails some form of differentiation or newness. But in product design and product development, tiered releases and differentiation often replace true innovation. Every year there’s a new iPod or iPhone. Every year there’s a new version on a car model. Each new release incorporates only slight or cosmetic changes.

But improvement alone may not be enough. Look at what airbnb or Uber are doing to the hospitality and taxi sectors without actually owning anything. There are macro forces at play that are hard to understand i.e. The Cloud that is disrupting established and proven economic business models.

For most companies it’s all about staying ahead of the competition and ensuring quarterly results. This may very well prove to be very short sighted.

Just recently Apple shipped its 1 billionth mobile device, amazing success by any economic standard, but did anybody stop and think about what this really means? We are now so connected with technology that people are constantly burying themselves in their phones that we seem to have lost the art of real communication. So we had disruptive innovation on a grand scale but lost the ability to talk to each other – a very wicked problem. Depending upon your point of view that might be a good or bad thing!

Characteristics of a wicked problem

Horst Rittel highlights ten characteristics of a wicked problem[ii]:

  1. Wicked problems have no definitive formulation. The customer service issues facing one industry or organisation can be fundamentally different to another.
  2. Every wicked problem is unique.
  3. It’s hard, maybe impossible, to measure or claim success with wicked problems because they bleed into one another, unlike the boundaries of traditional design problems that can be articulated or defined.
  4. Solutions to wicked problems can be only good or bad, not true or false.
  5. There is no template to follow when tackling a wicked problem, although history may provide a guide.
  6. There are multiple explanations for a wicked problem.
  7. Every wicked problem is a symptom of another problem.
  8. No mitigation strategy for a wicked problem has a definitive scientific test because humans invented wicked problems and science exists to understand natural phenomena.
  9. Offering a “solution” to a wicked problem frequently is a “one shot” design effort because a significant intervention changes the design space enough to minimise the ability for trial and error.
  10. Designers attempting to address a wicked problem must be fully responsible for their actions.

How does one tame a wicked problem?

The term wicked problem emerged to address problems in social planning and designing public policy. Design problems are typically wicked because they are often ill defined (no prescribed way forward), involve stakeholders with different perspectives, and have no “right” or “optimal” solution.[iii] Thus wicked problems cannot be solved by the application of standard methods; they demand creative and unique solutions.

To tame a wicked problem requires collaboration and creativity. Processes need to be developed to ensure all stakeholders are involved in finding ways to manage the problem[iv]. This will make the planning process more complex, but it also expands the potential for creativity as well as achieving buy-in from all involved.

The ultimate aim should be to create a shared understanding of the problem and encourage a joint commitment to possible ways of resolving it. Not everyone will agree on what the problem is, but stakeholders should be able to understand one another’s positions well enough to discuss different interpretations of the problem and work together to tackle it.

[i] http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/wicked_problems_problems_worth_solving

[ii] http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/wicked_problems_problems_worth_solving

[iii] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wicked_problem

[iv] https://hbr.org/2008/05/strategy-as-a-wicked-problem

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, CallCenter, Customer service, Customer Servs, Social Media

The social dimension of customer relationships III

By Mark Atterby

Social CRM is about generating conversations and dialogue with prospects to build higher value customer relationships. That’s higher value for the customer as well as the organisation. Social media is not simply a vehicle to push out content and your messaging, but a mechanism to receive feedback from customers that can be analysed and used to improve customer strategies.

Social CRM, when implemented properly, allows you to understand what is important to your prospects and customers and what influences their buying decisions. Customers annoyed or frustrated with poor service will vent their displeasure on social media. Making their grievances public and sharing them with their network allows them to finally be heard.  One poor experience can affect the reputation of the organisation with dozens, hundreds, or thousands of others.

In building you Social CRM strategy, don’t get too caught up with the technology. Technology is important, you will need it to automate as many processes as you can. But the most important thing to consider is the goals you want to achieve and defining the processes.

How do you turn a conversation into a customer

There are numerous approaches to Social CRM you can deploy depending on the nature of your business and customers. Regardless of what specific strategies you implement, one thing is for certain, you will need to allocate and train dedicated staff or contact centre teams to be Social CRM specialists.

The key social media activity where CRM intersects is with listening and monitoring conversations. There is a lot of noise created through social media. Sifting through this deluge and identifying the right voice and conversations to respond to, is one of the top challenges.

Your social media agents will need to listen, monitor and filter relevant conversations about the brand and its customers. They then need to assess whether a response is required and if a response is required does that need to be included in a CRM workflow i.e. are they responding to a customer or potential prospect.

If people are complaining about a product or service than you can safely assume they are a customer and the conversation needs to be tracked in a CRM system for later reference and analysis. The difficulty becomes that the name they use on their social media accounts may not directly correlated with the information you have stored as a customer.

Or if there is a conversation where someone is asking for an opinion about a product or service, this is likely to become a lead or sales opportunity. Organisations need to listen very keenly to differentiate and prioritise various conversations.

There are a plethora of tools on the market to help organisations monitor their social media interactions, but it’s about building the skills and processes to utilise them effectively that presents the greatest challenge.

That’s why one of the biggest growth areas for BPO providers in recent years has been social media monitoring and listening, and integrating these activities with other customer channels and CRM systems.

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, Contact Centre, Customer service, theOutsourcing-guide

Building Out-Come Based Pricing Models

By Martin Conboy 

pricingThe continuing rise in the number of contracts containing outcome-based pricing models provides obvious rewards and benefits for BPO buyers and vendors. But there are dangers and challenges where the vendor can be expected to take on all the risks.

Traditionally, outsourcing buyers and providers have engaged in sourcing models that were safe but suboptimal. Contracts, arrangements and pricing based on providing staff, materials or fixed capacity service delivery.

In the past, buyers approached sourcing as a way to access the right skills at the right price at the right time, without exploring the full potential of their outsourcing relationships. Meanwhile, providers have tended to play it safe by sticking to time and material manpower-linked growth models that do not necessarily maximise value.

Outcome pricing has accelerated strongly in recent years, across industries, both as a response to rapid commoditization and as a strategy for increasing value capture and margins. Outcome based pricing mechanisms cannot only help to combat commoditization, but to create customer value.

For BPO and outsourcing relationships to help clients innovate and add value to their organisation, the contracts need to contain outcome-based pricing models. Outcomes based pricing means the customer contracts and pays for business results delivered by the provider, rather than for defined activities, tasks or assets. The contract focuses on the desired outcome of the work to be performed rather than how it will be performed.

What is Gainsharing?

Gainsharing is a system that includes (1) a financial measurement and feedback system to monitor company performance and distribute gains in the form of bonuses when appropriate, and (2) a focused involvement system to eliminate barriers to improved company performance. Gainsharing systems vary widely in terms of their design and the degree to which they are integrated into the regular operating systems of the company. Of course, the more they are integrated into the day-to-day operational systems, the more commitment there is to the Gainsharing system. And, the more commitment there is to achieving overall business goals (including the Gainsharing goals) the better the resulting performance is.

Shifting control and risk to the provider

This shifts control and risk to the service provider. But it also means that if the provider builds a more efficient way of delivering the same results, it will be financially rewarded for its innovation. Traditional input based pricing is safer and easier to manage and understand from the vendor point of view.

If the contract states that 50 FTEs will be provided for 40 hours a week for 12 months, to manage all inbound customer service calls, there is no incentive for the provider to innovate and provide better service with fewer staff. The model is built around a fixed cost per agent per hour with all of the know costs factored into that hourly rate. Thus rightly or wrongly KPIs like average handling time (AHT) become the main measure for success and efficiency.

The client doesn’t want 50 people answering phones as such, they actually want their customers to have their issues resolved quickly and efficiently,( First Call Resolution) but they do not have all of the necessary resources, skills and capacity to allow that to happen. It follows that if AHT is a key performance indicator many clients are going to not have their issues resolved to their satisfaction and consequence may have to call back to get more assistance, thus driving costs up as the BPO has to handle additional calls.

Leaving it up to the provider to decide how it will deliver on the customer requirements and being rewarded for innovation, means it has the incentive to develop and improve how the service is delivered.

With outcomes based pricing, however, the service provider must assume a great deal of risk since it does not have influence over all aspects that impact its ability to achieve the outcome. And the amount of risk increases significantly when the outcome is higher up on the value chain. In the above example the provider does not have control over every channel or interaction with the end consumers. Something the client does, or something generally in the market, or anything beyond the control of the provider could impact the delivery of the service.

A true partnership is required

For a pricing model to be successful, it should strike the right balance between the customer’s expectations of quality, timeliness and price, and the service provider’s cost and operational efficiency. Customer engagements may not be successful with one type of pricing model every time. it’s a journey for both the parties to explore based on best fit for the scoped services and engagement models

For outcomes based pricing to work the two different organisations need to know more about each other and trust each other as partners. The vendor needs greater understanding of the industry and markets the client operates in, as the vendor is now potentially exposed to the threats and challenges of the clients business.

A deeper partnership approach to outsourcing relationships is required. Outcome based sourcing engenders a greater level of dependency on the service provider. The buyer needs to understand the level of risk that the provider must accept to help the customer achieve the desired business outcome.

Buyer and provider need to work closer together in a partner relationship where there is strong governance and relationship management. This will entail greater collaboration and longer contracts that can change and adapt over time. Both organizations must work towards a position of Interoperability and have the ability of making systems and organizations work together.

The days of a client simply throwing their BPO challenge over the fence and making their problem someone else problem for a cheaper price are well and truly over.

Originally Published in the Sauce eNewsletter – theOutsourcing-Guide.com

theOutsourcing-guide.com is the ultimate reference guide for the BPO and outsourcing industries and it will become the most comprehensive resource for organisations looking to engage BPO and outsourcing providers. As well as providing a range of eBooks, articles and whitepapers explaining the various aspects of BPO, theOutsourcing-guide.com provides an online directory of providers segmented by category and location.

theOutsourcing-guide.com is a vehicle for vendors and service providers to showcase their organisations and the outsourcing services they provide. Visit theOutsourcing-guide.com for more information.

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BPO, Contact Centre, Customer service, Human resources, Outsourcing

What are Filipinos like?

By Derek Stewart

When Australian SMEs are considering hiring offshore staff in the Philippines, sooner or later, they will ask me: “What are Filipinos’ like?

Let’s pause for a moment and reverse the question to one I am often asked by Filipinos, as an Aussie expat living in the Philippines: “What are Australians’ like?

Wow. Where to begin? It depends on who they are, where they’re from, what they do, how old they are and more. Aussies are famously laid back, but what about the city slickers in Melbourne and Sydney CBDs? Life sure moves quickly there. Just try standing still on a train station escalator during peak hour.

What about the quality of their work? Their work ethic? Their honesty? Their integrity? Will they steal or cheat?

When I was backpacking through the USA more than one hostel had a “No Australians” hiring policy. Too often they would agree to have guests work a half day in exchange for free accommodation, only to have the Aussies being too hungover to show up. This happened enough that they refused to entertain job applications from any Australians. While not always on your best behaviour when travelling abroad for fun and adventure, it’s interesting to see the perspective that people abroad have of Australians in some circumstances.

What about accents and the quality of their English? Are they difficult to understand and will it cause frustration?

Many Australians are turned down from teaching English in Asia because they don’t have a desirable American accent. The people running the school think they’re talking with marbles in their mouth, butchering proper English by replacing perfectly good words with incomprehensible slang. They apologise but explain it’s not something they would want their students to accidentally copy.

What about salaries and price as a reflection of quality? Surely you get what you pay for?

Australians have some of the highest wages in the world, which would logically make them the best performing workers in the world? Right? Well, that depends on if you have tried to source talent from other parts of the world as a point of comparison. You need to examine how the quality compares, how the cost compares, and by the mix of the two, which yields better overall value for your business.

Read full story visit http://www.theoutsourcing-guide.com/article/filipinos-like/

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